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(Photo courtesy of the National Corvette Museum)
(Photo courtesy of the National Corvette Museum)

Every man’s fantasy — The National Corvette Museum

A few years ago, we spent a week at the Diamond Caverns Mid-Atlantic RV Resort on our way south. We were only a few miles from the Mammoth Cave National Park, but it was closed when we arrived due to the government shutdown.

After a few days, our friends Bill and Kris Osborne, arrived in their Allegro bus and suggested we visit the National Corvette Museum in Bowling Green, Ky.

The 115,000-square-foot uniquely shaped building is home to about 80 Corvettes and one-of-a-kind concept cars, including the 1 millionth Corvette ever made.

In addition to viewing the gorgeous cars, you’ll have a chance to view movies and videos and enjoy posters showing the evolution of Corvette advertising. We loved the full-size dioramas showing various Corvettes in settings resembling the period in which they were sold, which dates back to 1953 when the first vehicle rolled off the assembly line.

Corvette 1

This beautiful new red Stingray was only one of about 12 new ‘vettes being delivered to their new owners at the museum that day.

Corvette 2

This white 1957 fuel-injected model only had 3.5 miles on it and was insured for $750,000.

The Corvette was the first American mass-produced sports car. Last year, 34,240 Corvettes were made and, depending upon styling and options, some were truly one-of-a-kind varieties.

Corvette 3

This is an example of an interesting styling variation that is on display at the museum. There are so many to look, but it was very interesting to see the evolution of design. One thing is for certain — there’s no mistaking any car for a Corvette.

The Corvette Museum was rocked by disaster at 5:39 a.m. on Feb. 12, 2014, just four months after we visited. A giant sinkhole opened up right in the Skydome section of the museum and swallowed eight classic cars, including the 1 millionth sports car made.

You can watch a video of the event as it unfolded and some of the aftermath in this YouTube video by clicking here.

Don’t worry, the problem was fixed, some of the cars were restored and the museum is back in shape.

The museum, which is located at 350 Corvette Drive in Bowling Green is open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. every day, except New Years Day, Easter, Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve and Christmas Day.

Tickets are $10 for adults, $8 for seniors, $5 for children 6 to 16 and free for kids 5 years old and younger. Active military members are admitted free.

Plan to spend a day at the museum, which also serves breakfast and lunch at the Corvette Cafe.

For more information, visit www.corvettemuseum.org.

Tour the assembly plant, too

If you plan your trip, you can even take in a tour of the General Motors Bowling Green Assembly Plant across the street and watch the cars as they are being built.

The tour costs $7 per person, but active duty military members are admitted free, as are current GM employees and retirees. In fact, military members and their guests are admitted free.

The one-mile walking tour takes place Monday through Friday at 8:30 and 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. There are several blackout dates to accommodate holidays and plant retooling, so be sure to check their website to ensure the plant is open. www.bowlinggreenassemblyplant.com.

Children under 7 aren’t allowed, and strollers or walking assist devices aren’t allowed for safety reasons. Also, the plant is pretty strict in enforcing a no-electronics rule, which means cameras, video equipment, cell phones and walkie-talkies aren’t allowed.

To book a tour of the manufacturing plant, click here.

The tour wasn’t offered the day we visited, so we were only able to tour the museum — and that was special enough. So many Corvettes . . . so little money.

About John Huggins

John Huggins is a retired Navy Electronics Technician Chief. He traded the Navy adventure for a job in manufacturing quality assurance in 1986, and traded that job for the RV adventure in early 2005. He and his wife, Kathy, have traveled the nation chronicling their adventures at Living the RV Dream. They have authored several books and also produce a weekly podcast about the RV lifestyle.

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